Health


Science Daily - United States

Lethal prostate cancer can spread from other metastatic sites, study affirms

A new genomic analysis of tissue from patients with prostate cancer has added more evidence that cells within metastases from such tumors can migrate to other body parts and form new sites of spread on their own.

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 8:15 pm

‘Firefly’ mechanism makes cancer studies more efficient, less expensive

The mechanism that makes fireflies glow through a process called bioluminescence can be used to study tumor response to therapy as well, researchers have found. Bioluminescence has a major role in small animal research, and the technique has been widely applied in tumor models. The multiple tumor approach can also be used for high throughput screening of a vast range of anti-cancer drug therapies.

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 8:15 pm

Eyeliner application may cause eye problems, study finds

People who apply eyeliner on the inner eyelid run the risk of contaminating the eye and causing vision trouble, according to research. This is the first study to prove that particles from pencil eyeliner move into the eye.

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 6:54 pm

Researchers ‘smell’ new receptors that could underlie the many actions of the anesthetic drug ketamine

Researchers are continuing their work in trying to understand the mechanisms through which anesthetics work to elicit the response that puts millions of Americans to sleep for surgeries each day. Their most recent study looked at ketamine, an anesthetic discovered in the 1960s and more recently prescribed as an anti-depressant at low doses. They have identified an entirely new class of receptors that ketamine binds in the body, which may underlie its diverse actions.

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 6:50 pm

Presence of heart pouch may explain strokes of unknown origin, study finds

A pouchlike structure inside the heart’s left atrial chamber in some people may explain strokes that otherwise lack an identifiable cause, according to researchers. Stroke is the leading cause of long-term severe disability and the fourth-most-common cause of death in the U.S. About 80 percent of the 700,000-plus strokes that occur annually in this country are due to blood clots blocking a brain artery. In up to a third of these cases, the clots’ origin cannot be determined.

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 5:32 pm

Lifting families out of poverty, with dignity

America’s welfare state is quietly evolving from needs-based to an employment-based safety net that rewards working families and fuels dreams of a better life, indicates a new study. The major reason, authors indicate: the little-known Earned Income Tax Credit, a $65 billion federal tax-relief program for poor, working families. The program has been expanded dramatically during the past 25 years, while cash welfare has been sharply curtailed.

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 5:32 pm

Predicting chronic pain in whiplash injuries

While most people recover from whiplash injuries within a few months, about 25 percent have long-term pain and disability for many months or years. Using special MRI imaging, scientists identified, within the first one and two weeks of the injury, which patients will develop chronic pain and disability. This is the earliest these patients have been identified and will enable faster treatment. The imaging revealed large amounts of fat infiltrating the patients’ neck muscles, indicating rapid atrophy.

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 5:32 pm


MSN Health - United States

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Indian Express - India

Anxiety linked to higher risk of stroke

Anxiety disorders are one of the most prevalent mental health problems.

Posted on 20 December 2013 @ 10:38 am

Chewing gum can give kids migraine

Until now there has been little medical research on the relationship between gum chewing and headaches.

Posted on 20 December 2013 @ 10:36 am

New technique to diagnose autism in babies

Barbaro is training medical experts around the globe in the use of her diagnostic method.

Posted on 14 December 2013 @ 9:37 am

HIV may up risk of heart disease

Study shows an association between the presence of HIV virus in the blood and cardiac disease.

Posted on 12 December 2013 @ 10:18 am

Exercising regularly can prevent dementia

No. of people living with dementia worldwide is set to treble and reach 135 million by 2050.

Posted on 10 December 2013 @ 7:52 am

Indian Cancer Congress calls for change in narcotic regulations in India

Narcotic regulations prevents easy access to pain relieving medications to cancer patients.

Posted on 7 December 2013 @ 10:40 am

US warns of problems with Philips heart devices

The recall affects about 700,000 defibrillators sold between 2005 and 2012.

Posted on 4 December 2013 @ 6:08 am

BBC - Great Britain

Blood test for Down’s syndrome hailed

Testing a pregnant woman’s blood for disorders in her unborn child promises ‘dramatic’ advances in medicine, say researchers.

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 10:08 pm

Paracetamol ‘no good for back pain’

Paracetamol is ineffective at treating back pain and osteoarthritis despite being a recommended treatment, a group of Australian researchers warns.

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 11:06 pm

VIDEO: Could existing drugs offer MS hope?

Depression and heart-disease drugs are to be tested in a trial to find treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) from existing medicines.

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 9:39 pm

MS drug ‘may already be out there’

Depression and heart disease drugs are to be tested in a new trial to find treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 5:00 pm

VIDEO: Clive James ‘thankful for life’

Five years after being diagnosed with terminal leukaemia, Australian broadcaster and poet Clive James says he is near to death but thankful for life.

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 9:19 am

Uganda circumcision truck fights HIV

Uganda circumcision truck fights HIV

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 2:10 am

Chikungunya revives herbal remedies in Antigua

Antigua sees revival of natural remedies

Posted on 29 March 2015 @ 12:35 am

Yahoo - United States

Questions persist about sexual effects of baldness drug

A review of clinical trials on a popular drug to treat hair loss in men found that none of the studies adequately reported on sexual side effects, researchers sayA review of 34 clinical trials on a popular drug to treat hair loss in men found that none of the studies adequately reported on sexual side effects, researchers said. The findings raise serious questions about whether the drug — known as finasteride and marketed as Propecia and Proscar, among other names — is safe, said the report by scientists at Northwestern University, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Dermatology on Wednesday. The drug, approved in 1992, works by interfering with testosterone, and the pharmaceutical giant Merck lists decreased sex drive, impotence and problems with ejaculation among its common side effects.


Posted on 2 April 2015 @ 12:29 am

Children’s Health for Corporate Profits- A Fair Compromise?

Children's Health for Corporate Profits- A Fair Compromise?A "chemical safety" bill is rapidly moving through the U.S. Senate. Writing in Bloomberg, Paul Barrett decries the "hyperbole" of those of us who are calling for stronger health and environmental protections than the industry-backed bill delivers. Barrett notes that many agree that our current chemical law is broken, but who could have believed…


Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 11:55 pm

Last Cuban Ebola medics leave S.Leone, new clampdown for Easter

Health workers wearing personal protective equipment assist an Ebola patient at the Kenema treatment centre in Kenema, Sierra Leone on November 15, 2014The last remaining Cuban medics sent to Sierra Leone in October last year to help in the fight against Ebola left the country on Wednesday, as the number of infections there is falling. The 66 remaining Cuban medics who answered a call from the World Health Organization to come to Sierra Leone as Ebola raged six months ago left on Wednesday, saying they believed the country was well on the way to defeating the virus. The head of the Cuban delegation, Doctor Jorge Delgado Butillo, told AFP by telephone his staff had "helped to save the life of a great number of people infected with Ebola". Sierra Leone's National Ebola Response Centre (NERC) said during the three-day nationwide clampdown, 263 sick people were evacuated from their homes of which 10 were confirmed to have tested positive for the virus.


Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 11:35 pm

Ebola vaccine tests show it could ‘neutralise’ virus: Geneva hospital

Medical staff clean their protection suits as part of the fight against the Ebola virus on March 8, 2015 at the Donka hospital in ConakryAn experimental Ebola vaccine tested on humans in Europe and Africa sparks the production of the antibodies needed to neutralise the deadly virus, a Geneva hospital said Wednesday. There is no licensed treatment or vaccine for Ebola, and the World Health Organization last year endorsed rushing potential ones through trials in a bid to stem the epidemic still simmering in west Africa. Initial clinical trials of the VSV-ZEBOV candidate vaccine, manufactured by the Public Health Agency of Canada and developed by Merck, show that it "triggers the production of antibodies capable of neutralising the Ebola virus," the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) said in a statement.


Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 9:57 pm

Too much iced tea caused Arkansas man’s kidney problems

This May 21, 2007 file photo shows a glass of iced tea in Concord, N.H. Doctors have traced an Arkansas man's kidney failure to an unusual cause — his habit of drinking a gallon of iced tea each day. He said he drank about 16 8-ounce cups of iced tea every day. Black tea has the chemical oxalate which known to cause kidney stones or even kidney failure in excessive amounts. The man is on dialysis, perhaps for the rest of his life. The case report is in the Thursday, April 2, 2015 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (AP Photo/Larry Crowe)NEW YORK (AP) — Doctors traced an Arkansas man's kidney failure to an unusual cause — his habit of drinking a gallon of iced tea each day.


Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 9:26 pm

The Importance of Community

The Importance of CommunityThroughout high school, college and after college, many of us are on a mission to have the highest number of friends possible. For some reason, we think it's quantity over quality. We're certain that we'll be cooler, happier and more popular based on a higher number – especially when social media comes into play. 'How many Facebook friends do…


Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 9:25 pm

DNA blood test is accurate for detecting Down syndrome

A blood test for pregnant mothers that detects an unborn child's DNA is better than standard tests at detecting Down syndrome, and returns fewer false positives, US researchers sayA blood test for pregnant mothers that detects an unborn child's DNA is better than standard tests at detecting Down syndrome, and returns fewer false positives, US researchers said Wednesday. The cell-free DNA blood test, which finds small amounts of floating DNA from the fetus in the mother's blood sample, can be given to a woman when she is between 10 and 14 weeks pregnant. Researchers studied nearly 16,000 women, and found that the cell-free DNA blood test correctly identified all 38 fetuses with Down syndrome in the group, said the study in the New England Journal of Medicine.


Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 9:20 pm

Time - United States

How Costa Rica Went 75 Days Using Only Clean Electricity

While governments from countries around the world this week have outlined how they plan to curb their carbon emissions, Costa Rica may seem like it’s showing off. The Central American country’s state utility company announced last week that it went the first 75 days of 2015 without using fossil fuels like coal or oil for…

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 9:07 pm

California Imposes First-Ever Mandatory Water Restrictions

The state is facing a historic drought

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 6:59 pm

Indian Army to Climb Everest to Remove Thousands of Pounds of Trash

“Sadly, Mount Everest is now also called the world’s highest junkyard”

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 2:56 pm

Some NYC Ants Like to Eat Junk Food, Study Finds

The study may indicate which ants could help humans clean up trash

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 12:42 pm

Level Up! Gamers May Learn Visual Skills More Quickly

Practice not only makes perfect, it may improve gamers’ ability to learn

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 9:55 am

White House Outlines Plans to Cut Carbon Emissions By Up to 28%

The plan is the first step toward achieving an 80% reduction in carbon emissions by 2050

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 4:44 pm

This Is How Ants React in Space

With surprising agility, study finds

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 1:42 pm

Mayo Clinic - United States

Morgellons disease: Managing a mysterious skin condition

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 12:00 am

Testosterone therapy: Potential benefits and risks as you age

Posted on 1 April 2015 @ 12:00 am

Shock: First aid

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 12:00 am

Hypothermia: First aid

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 12:00 am

Heatstroke: First aid

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 12:00 am

Heat exhaustion: First aid

Posted on 31 March 2015 @ 12:00 am

Snacks: How they fit into your weight-loss plan

Posted on 28 March 2015 @ 12:00 am


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