Tech/Science


BBC News – Great Britain

Hubble scores unique close-up view of distant galaxy

The Hubble telescope has scored an unprecedented close-up view of one of the Universe’s oldest galaxies.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 10:58 am

Jordan urged to end animal mistreatment at Petra site

Donkeys, horses and camels are beaten and forced to carry tourists in extreme heat, a group says.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 10:35 am

Wallaby gives police slip on Sydney Bridge

The unusual sight of a wallaby bounding across the Sydney Harbour Bridge has surprised early-morning motorists.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 3:02 am

Black Death ‘spread by humans not rats’

Human body lice, rather than rat fleas, spread plague during the Black Death, a study simulating the outbreak suggests.

Posted on 15 January 2018 @ 8:00 pm

Huge oil spill left after burning tanker sinks off China

Fuel from the Sanchi has spread over more than 100 sq km and could badly damage marine life.

Posted on 15 January 2018 @ 12:40 pm

‘Floating on air’ after surgeons remove 19kg tumour

Watch surgeons as they remove a 19.5kg tumour from a woman’s body.

Posted on 15 January 2018 @ 12:44 am

How flowering plants conquered the world

Scientists solve Darwin’s “abominable mystery”: How flowers rapidly evolved and spread across the globe.

Posted on 14 January 2018 @ 12:12 am


Science News – United States

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CNet – United States

Lyft grows gangbusters in 2017, bringing competition to Uber – CNET

The US-based ride-hailing company gave 375.5 million rides in 2017, more than double the amount it gave a year earlier.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 2:00 pm

This diamond-studded smartwatch costs nearly $200K – CNET

TAG Heuer’s latest creation is the world’s most expensive smartwatch to date, but its tech is standard wearable fare.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 1:52 pm

iPhone 7 Plus was almost China’s top-selling phone in 2017 – CNET

Apple, the only foreign phone maker to hit China’s top 10 list, was beaten to the top spot by Oppo’s R9S.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 1:46 pm

Most Americans say social media is making the news worse – CNET

A survey reveals that the majority of Americans polled aren’t happy with the impact of social media on the news.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 1:33 pm

Tesla, Apple aren’t self-driving leaders, study argues – Roadshow

The 2018 Navigant Autonomous Driving Leaderboard shows a major gap between public perception and capability when it comes to autonomous-drive research.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 1:13 pm

In 2018, voice assistants will make the leap out of your home – CNET

Alexa and Google Assistant want to be on the go with you, plugging into smart glasses, smart earbuds and even smart toilets.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 1:00 pm

Ford teases new Shelby Mustang GT500 with more than 700 horsepower – Roadshow

New range-topping model will arrive in 2019.

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 11:24 am

Computer World – United States

IDG Contributor Network: CES 2018: Microsoft’s broad near-term vision of our very different technology future

[Disclosure: Microsoft is a client of the author.]

I got to sit down with Microsoft prior to the start of CES to talk about the broad future visions they’ve been sharing with folks all week.  As you would expect, given this is CES, focus was on personal technology.  This was separate from Surface or any other tightly focused effort and it was more Windows centric as well.  The near-term future of personal technology strategy from Microsoft is broken down into the following areas:

Lots of choice

This has always been a keystone of the Microsoft strategy in the 1980s/90s and why they so easily rolled over Apple and Sun last century.  They had the advantage of leverage because they had lots of hardware licensees while Apple and Sun had to go it alone.  (Strangely this strategy didn’t work with Smartphones but that was largely because Microsoft didn’t capture the developers like they did initially with Windows). 

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Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 2:32 pm

CES 2018: Apple’s CarPlay wins friends and frenemies

Apple may (or may not) have scaled-back its ambition to build its own connected vehicles, but at CES 2018 we still saw lots of news around its CarPlay system. Here’s a brief run-down on what happened:

What they’re saying

CES 2018 saw lots of conversation on the topic of connected cars, but the big truth remains that as the industry digs deeper into the attempt to create automated and semi-automated transport, it’s becoming clearer that the challenge isn’t only technical – regulatory, privacy, safety and a host of other puzzles also need to be resolved.

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Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 1:18 pm

Maersk, IBM create world’s first blockchain-based, electronic shipping platform

Maersk and IBM today announced a joint venture to deploy a blockchain-based  electronic shipping system that will digitize supply chains and track international cargo in real time.

The new platform could save the global shipping industry billions of dollars a year by replacing the current EDI- and paper-based system, which can leave containers in receiving yards for weeks, according to the companies.

Blockchain will enable a single view via a virtual dashboard of all goods and shipping information for all parties involved, from manufacturers and shippers to port authorities and government agencies.

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Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 12:01 pm

How to make sure Windows gets the right patches coming to it

The Windows emergency security updates issued by Microsoft earlier this month came with an unprecedented prerequisite – a new key stored in the operating system’s registry – that antivirus vendors were told to generate after they’d guaranteed their code wouldn’t trigger dreaded Blue Screens of Death (BSoD) when users apply the patches.

The demands confused customers, and fueled a flood of support documents and an avalanche of web content. Those who heard about the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities struggled to figure out whether their PCs were protected, and if not, why not. Millions more, not having gotten wind of the potential threat, carried on without realizing that their PCs might be barred from receiving several months’ worth of security updates.

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Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 11:12 am

See how much that helped?

Flashback to the 1980s, when this pilot fish at a big computer vendor is working on a team that’s wiring hardware for some production equipment.

“It required very good vision and concentration, as we were wire-wrapping pins on the backplane to connect certain pins together, and we had to make sure we had the proper pin for the proper slot for the proper side of the module,” says fish.

“As we were trying to wire the components, one my co-workers decided he wanted some music, so he turned on some hard rock — loudly.

“All of a sudden, productivity dropped to near zero. There we were, trying to count the pins to wire: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, L…no no, A, B, C, H…no, no…A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H.

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Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 11:00 am

How to create and edit PDFs in Microsoft Word

You’ve been asked to supply a letter of reference by email. You compose one in Microsoft Word — but this is sensitive information. How do you keep someone from changing your words?

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(Insider Story)

Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 11:00 am

Will Apple finally pay a price for keeping secrets?

At first I thought Apple would get away with deliberately slowing down its older iPhones when their batteries aged. I mean, when it comes to techno fandom loyalty, you can’t beat hardcore Apple fans. They love their iGadgets. But maybe I was wrong.

As Hyoun Park, CEO of Amalgam Insights, pointed out, “Apple’s sin in this case was in not providing any explanation on the performance slowdown fix until it was basically caught.” Instead, users were forced to find out about the problem themselves and either to “voluntarily void their warranties to replace their batteries on the cheap or to pay Apple’s $79 battery replacement fee to keep the performance that they were used to having.”

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Posted on 16 January 2018 @ 10:00 am


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